1

Beginnings

In 1960 Suzuki started their International Racing career by entering the 125cc class of the Isle of Man TT
2
Only two years later
Suzuki won their first 50cc world GP at the 1962 Argentinian GP
3
Barry Sheene
started 75 races with Suzuki across various classes and stood on the podium a staggering 52 times.
4
Colleda
In the 1960 TT programme Suzuki do not appear due to a misunderstanding of the registration process and so the bike model name, Colleda, appears instead.
5
Even without a factory team,
the 1970 World GP 125cc Championship was won by Dieter Braun on a bike on loan from Suzuki.
6
7 of the top 10
World Championship riders rode for Suzuki in 1980
7
1981
In the 1981 World Championship Suzuki took pole position in 10 out of the 11 rounds
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7 in a row
In 1982 Suzuki won their 7th consecutive manufacturers title.
9
Tenacious
Kevin Schwantz and Wayne Rainey were so competitive with each other they battled each other in the 1987 Trans-Atlantic Match Races when they should have been racing as a team against the British riders.
10
1980
Suzuki wins 5-year consecutive manufacturer's title
11
7
The amount of AMA superbike championships won by Suzuki’s Mat Mladin - no other rider has won more than three...
12
1962
saw Suzuki win the Manufacturer’s Championship in their first full-season entry into on-road racing
13
1971
saw Suzuki win both the 250cc AND the 500cc World Motocross championships
14
Junior
When Kenny Roberts Jnr won his world championship on his Suzuki RGB500 he became the only ever son of a previous champion to take the same title.
15
Injection
In 2007 Suzuki were the first motorcycle manufacturer to introduce fuel injection to a motocross machine.
16
Courage
In the 1976 TT John Williams ran out of petrol within sight of the chequered flag. Not to let this stop him, he pushed his RG500 across the line to finish in 7th.
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10 years
Suzuki won the newly introduced 125cc class in the World Motocross Championship in 1975 and retained the title for the next 10 years.
18
First on-board
In 1959 Suzuki filmed the first ever on-board camera lap of the Isle of Man TT course using a Morris Minor 1000 and a Suzuki Employee sitting on the bonnet filming.
19
First racer
The first ever Suzuki bike designed specifically for racing was the 50cc Colleda RT60 and was capable of doing over 80MPH.
20
Nine in a row
On his way to his second FIM World Motocross Championship in 2003 Mickael Pichon won an unprecedented nine consecutive-round victories.
21
Ingenious
Barry Sheene invented the motorcycle back protector, with a prototype model he made himself out of old helmet visors.
22
34
The FIM retired the race number 34 from use out of respect for Suzuki rider Kevin Schwantz after he left the sport.
23
50p
2010 sees the minting of a commerative 50p coin on the Isle of Man in honor of Mitsuo Ito, the only Japanese rider to have won the TT, and fifty years of Suzuki racing on the island.
24
Quadzilla
The LT500R quadracer was affectionately known as "quadzilla" and even though it first appeared in the 80s, it's still regarded as the fastest stock ATV ever at around 80mph.
25
Winner
Ricky Carmichael won all 12 events in the 250cc Outdoor National Championship in 2005 on an RM250.
26
Jeremy Burgess
the chief race engineer for world champions Wayne Garder, Mick Doohan and Valentino Rossi began by racing a Suzuki RG500 and becoming Randy Mamola's race engineer at Team Heron Suzuki.
27
For seven years...
...after it’s first full-season in 1962, Suzuki bike or rider won either the rider or the manufacturer title, earning Suzuki a global reputation as a “lightweight specialist”
28
Shoe Bike
In 2009, DC Shoes, Travis Pastrana and Ken Block created a Suzuki motocross bike with DC-Shoes instead of tires. Travis still performed back-flips and a burn-out with it before the soles wore off...
29
1973
Suzuki takes 3-year consecutive World Motocross Championship 500cc class title with rider Roger De Coste
30
First into motocross
Suzuki was the first of the Japanese manufacturers to enter the World Motocross Championships, first competing in 1966.